Men's Articles

Dislocated Joint


A dislocated joint occurs when the normal alignment of the joint has been disrupted. A common way to refer to a dislocation is to describe the joint as being "pulled out of its socket". A person suspected of having a dislocated joint should not be moved; medical help should be summoned and first aid provided.

If it is absolutely necessary to move the injured person prior to medical assistance arriving, immobilize the affected area with a splint of some kind. A dislocation is a serious injury and the injured person should receive immediate medical attention. Shoulder dislocation involves the displacement of the humerus (upper arm bone) from its socket in the shoulder joint.

Signs and symptoms of a shoulder dislocation include excruciating pain at the time of the injury; loss of function of the dislocated shoulder joint and severe pain when trying to move it; tenderness over the dislocation; swelling and bruising at the site of the injury; and numbness or paralysis in the arm from pressure, pinching or cutting of blood vessels or nerves.

Also, there may be visible deformity if the dislocated bones lock in the dislocated position. If they reposition themselves spontaneously, there will be no visible deformity, but the damage will be the same. The treatment for a shoulder dislocation should begin immediately with a call for medical assistance, followed by keeping the person warm with blankets to prevent shock.

Unless it is absolutely necessary to prevent further injury, do not move the injured person - wait for medical assistance. Only a doctor or a trained person should attempt to reposition a dislocated shoulder. In extreme cases surgery is needed to restore the joint to its normal position. After the shoulder dislocation has been corrected, the shoulder may need to be immobilized for up to 8 weeks.

Complete healing of the injured ligaments requires at least 6 weeks, and usually involves a rehabilitation program to prevent a recurrence. Hip dislocation is a serious injury in which the adjoining bones in the hip are displaced so that they no longer touch each other. Dislocations are frequently accompanied by bone fractures, torn ligaments and torn tendons.

Immediate treatment is necessary to prevent permanent damage to the bone or to the sciatic nerve. Signs and symptoms of hip dislocation include severe pain in the hip at the time of the injury, and when trying to move the hip; loss of hip function; tenderness over the dislocation; swelling and bruising at the injury site; and numbness or paralysis below the dislocation from pressure, pinching or cutting of blood vessels or nerves.

Also, there may be visible deformity if the dislocated bones lock in the dislocated position. The leg may appear to be turned in and shortened. If the bones reposition themselves spontaneously, there will be no visible deformity, but the damage will be the same. The treatment for a hip dislocation should begin immediately with a call for medical assistance, followed by keeping the person warm with blankets to prevent shock.

Unless it is absolutely necessary to prevent further injury, do not move the injured person - wait for medical assistance. Only a doctor or a trained person should attempt to reposition a dislocated hip. In extreme cases surgery is needed to restore the joint to its normal position, and to repair torn ligaments and tendons.

After the dislocation has been corrected, the joint may need to be immobilized in a body cast for 4-6 weeks. Complete healing of injured ligaments requires a minimum of 6 weeks. Allow at least 3 months of healing before resuming active participation in sports. Rehabilitation exercises should be done daily beginning as soon as the pain subsides.

A finger dislocation is an injury to any finger joint so that adjoining bones are displaced from their normal position and no longer touch each other. Fractures and ligament sprains frequently occur at the same time as a finger dislocation. Finger dislocations are a common problem for athletes.

Signs and symptoms include excruciating pain in the finger at the time of the injury; loss of function in the dislocated joint; tenderness over the dislocation; severe pain when attempting to move the injured finger; swelling and bruising at the injury site; and numbness or paralysis beyond the dislocation from pressure, pinching or cutting of blood vessels or nerves.

Also, there may be visible deformity if the dislocated finger has locked in the dislocated position. If the bones reposition themselves spontaneously, there will be no visible deformity, but the damage will be the same. The treatment for a finger dislocation includes R.I.C.E. (rest, ice, compression, elevation), with care taken to avoid extreme movement of the affected finger.

Only a doctor should manipulate the dislocated finger to return the bones to their normal position. In extreme cases surgery may be required to restore the joint and repair torn ligaments and tendons. The hand may require immobilization with a cast or splint for 2-3 weeks. Complete healing of injured ligaments takes at least 6 weeks. Rehabilitation exercises should begin when supportive wrapping is no longer needed.

 

Copyright � 2005 - 2007 Men's Articles. All rights reserved.