Men's Articles

Bursitis


Shoulder bursitis, generally, is the inflammation of one of the bursas in the shoulder. Bursitis may vary in degree from mild irritation to an abscess formation that causes excruciating pain. As there are three or more types of shoulder bursitis, discussion will be of a general nature. Signs and symptoms include shoulder pain, tenderness, swelling, fever if infection is present, and limitation of shoulder motion. A doctor's diagnosis and treatment are necessary; a sling to support the shoulder joint may be needed. To prevent a frozen shoulder, begin normal, slow joint movement as soon as possible.

Mild, acute bursitis is a common, but not serious, problem and symptoms usually subside within 7-14 days with treatment. Chronic bursitis can cause recurrent flare-ups and up to 6-8 months to heal. Jumper's knee, patellar tendinitis, is the inflammation of the tendon which connects the patella, or kneecap, to the lower leg. Signs and symptoms include pain just below the kneecap; point tenderness and some swelling just below the kneecap; and at times a small defect can be noted in the tendon.

A doctor's diagnosis and treatment are necessary; the use of a brace that places pressure over that area can be helpful. Sometimes surgery may be required to remove the degenerated and inflamed portion of the tendon and, if necessary, reattach the tendon to the kneecap. This problem does not always resolve with routine care because of the amount of stress placed on the area and the poor vascular supply to the tendon. If you notice the onset of pain in the patella tendon, easing the activities that can cause pain, jumping and kicking, and use of ice, heat, and anti-inflammatories will help cure the problem of additional aggravation.

Knee bursitis is the inflammation of a bursa in the knee. Bursitis may vary in degree from mild irritation to an abscess formation that causes excruciating pain. Signs and symptoms include pain, especially when moving the knee; tenderness; swelling; redness; fever if infection is present; and limited motion in the knee. A doctor's diagnosis and treatment are necessary; crutches to prevent weight-bearing on the knee may be needed. To prevent a frozen knee, begin normal, slow knee movement as soon as possible. Knee bursitis is often a chronic problem. Symptoms may subside with treatment, but flare-ups are common. If surgery becomes necessary, allow 6-8 weeks for healing.

 

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